Plastic fast part 5: Down the tubes!

5th July 2012 by

It’s week 4 of my drastic plastic fast. One of the rules I set myself was that we could keep on using plastic-packaged products that we had bought before the fast began – but that when those ran out, we’d have to stock up with a plastic-free alternative.

One of the products that had me stumped for a while was toothpaste – they all seem to come in plastic tubes, and I don’t recall seeing those old-school metal tubes for a long time – and even they would most likely have plastic caps. So a bit of investigation (and some brilliant advice from commenters on this blog and from Facebook friends – thank you!) unearthed some more sustainable options.

First up: toothy tabs! These strange creatures are basically toothpaste in the form of a dry tablet. They weren’t too hard to find in London. But to be honest I found the idea pretty out there and not very appealing, so I’ve been putting off trying them. Yesterday morning, however, I finally bit the bullet (or the tablet, rather). Here’s what happened:


OK, not bad at all. Thanks to Karen from The Rubbish Diet for pointing me to these. Much less weird an experience than I’d feared. But I’m afraid a little pricey compared to regular tubes: 40 tablets in a box, that’s 10 days’ worth of brushing in my house; cost: £2.50-3.50 per box depending on what flavours you go for.

At Otesha we’ve got a bit of a DIY, make-do-and-mend ethos, so why not make your own toothpaste? I haven’t tried this yet, but I intend to.  One recipe goes like this:

  1. Mix three parts baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) with one part table salt (sodium chloride).
  2. Add three teaspoons of glycerine for every 1/4 cup of dry mixture.
  3. Add enough water to make a thick paste. If desired, a few drops of peppermint oil may be added to improve the taste.
  4. Apply and use just as you would any other toothpaste. Store unused toothpaste at room temperature in a covered container.

Click here for the source of that one and for more info.

There are more pearls of wisdom for your pearly whites at Polythene Pam’s blog. Pam has chosen the home-made route for herself – and though some people will tell you bicarb plus a bit of salt will do the job, Pam has gone all gourmet with her toothpaste recipe.

Or… how about going foraging for a twig to chew on – a combined brush-and-paste?

This one kind of tickles me – I love the idea of spurning shopping altogether and just finding my toothbrushing solution in a local park or garden. Of course, it has to be a twig from a tree with the right properties. In Senegal you’ll find people using gum tree twigs, among other species – and they’re said not only to clean as effectively as any brush and paste but also to have medicinal properties.

Of course people have found a way to make a buck out of naturally-occurring products. Buying it takes the fun out of it if you ask me. Wikipedia has a list of natural chew twig species – but of course, as with any wild plant consumption, please do your research thoroughly before you put anything in your mouth. NB. Reading something on Wikipedia does not constitute doing your research!

Talking of wild foods, there’s still time to join our east London wild food cycle, which takes place this Saturday, 7 July, and ends with a feast at Otesha HQ. All the details are here.

That’s it for now.  A final thought from National Geographic (thanks, Val, for finding this great image):

 

 

 

 

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