Green Jobs and Global Citizens

19th August 2014 by

A month or so ago, Otesha were joined by a group of wonderful volunteers from UCL’s Global Citizenship programme. Catherine, Catherine, and Julie spent two weeks learning about our Green Jobs programme, joining sessions, and conwindturbine2ducting their own research project into routes into Green Jobs. This document will become a valuable resource for future participants in our Green Jobs programmes. Their report is attached to this blog post – so check it out if you’re interested in the world of Green Jobs! A huge thanks goes to our excellent volunteers, for creating the report, donating us two weeks of their time, and bringing their energy and laughter to share with us.

Click here for the Green Jobs Report 

They also asked a friend to make us a great Green Jobs Infographic

 

 

 

Six Months on from the ‘Green and Decent Jobs’ Report at Otesha.

8th July 2013 by

Back in February 2013, Otesha joined forces with Intentionality to launch the ‘Green and Decent Jobs’ report reflecting on Otesha’s experiences delivering their Green Jobs Programme.  The initial plan was to follow a pipeline model, guiding participants through training, work experience, environmental literacy and ideally towards employment.  Otesha tried to create connections with the renewable energy construction industry to underpin the development of participants.   The report describes the barriers that were overcome and the important lessons learned.  The Green Jobs programme has since evolved from this formative experience, and now largely flies under the banner of ‘Branch Out’, as well as broader campaigning through the East London Green Jos Alliance  and our Roots of Success course.

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The report found that a significant barrier to the Green Economy’s growth has been the uncertainty surrounding national policy.  Unfortunately this remains the case with the blocking of the Energy Bill’s decarbonisation amendment.  However, this has not stopped Branch Out from reaching young people and making successful connections with like-minded organisations in Hackney that aim to provide these people with skills, training and opportunities.

 

A switch in the course’s emphasis from construction to horticulture has been key.  Once a week, the participants attend a session at St Mary’s Secret Garden working towards a City and Guilds Level 1 Award in Practical Horticulture Skills.  Additionally, there have been trips to induction days at Streetscape and Cre8 Arc for the participants to gain some work experience.  Overall, the horticulture sector seems more receptive to cooperating.  This is perhaps due to being less dependent on long-term investment that is required for  growth in the renewable energy construction industry.

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Although gardening and growing healthy food sustainably is close to our hearts (and stomachs) at Otesha, Branch Out offers much more.  In fact an impressively comprehensive suite of courses have been organised.   Throughout the 12 weeks that Branch Out runs, there are sessions in the kitchens at Made in Hackney; there is the accredited Roots of Success environmental literacy course; employability skills workshops; finance and money management sessions with MyBnk; individual mentoring sessions with Otesha’s Green Jobs Programme directors; and the option to be assigned a mentor once the participant has completed Branch Out.  Best of all, the course can be shaped by the participants themselves who are encouraged to suggest ideas for trips and talks.

In the 6 months since the ‘Green and Decent Jobs’ report, Otesha’s Green Jobs programme has come a long way.  We have a full compliment of activities, a dedicated network of supporting organisations, and most importantly, participants with loads of enthusiasm.  Our first batch of graduates have gone onto further horticulture training, and various other apprenticeships including solar panel installation.  Otesha are welcoming applicants for one more Branch Out in 2013, and three in 2014.

By Phil Aubert, green jobs volunteer

Green and decent jobs: Alliance-building for a Green Economy

18th February 2013 by

We’re pleased to announce the publication of a new report by Intentionality CIC and The Otesha Project UK:

Green and decent jobs: Alliance-building for a Green Economy

The report is available for download here (PDF).


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In 2010 The Otesha Project UK started to deliver their first Green Jobs Programme for young, unemployed people in East London. Intentionality CIC and Otesha have undertaken joint analysis of what can be learned from this Programme, drawing on Otesha’s experience over the last two years combined with Intentionality’s interviews with key stakeholders and background research about the wider political and economic context.

Being an account of real on-the-ground experience, illustrating how and why the growth of green jobs in the UK is being held back, both Otesha and Intentionality hope that this report can be used as a tool by other groups seeking to start their own green jobs initiatives.  It has been written with a diverse readership in mind, in particular:

  • for public bodies interested in job creation,
  • for young people and their youth workers interested in finding a career with green credentials,
  • for campaigners and environmentalists, and
  • for policymakers at a regional, national and international level.

Our nine recommendations are aimed primarily at local groups engaged in creating green jobs, or thinking about doing so.

Please circulate the report to friends and colleagues – and if you can promote it on social media and blog about it, we’d be hugely grateful.

As we slide into a triple dip recession, the picture for many of the UK’s young people is bleak. It is time for us to match the people that need the work, with the work that needs to be done.

Branch Out! Join our FREE horticultural work training programme

13th February 2013 by

GREEN JOBS ARE A-GO! Grow your way to a green-fingered career on Otesha’s newest programme -‘Branch Out’! Want to work outside, get some environmental qualifications and find a great green job at the end? Then join our 1st programme from April- June in Hackney!

Branch Out is totally FREE and open to ALL 16-25 year olds who can travel to East London 2 days a week. If you, or someone you know, wants to join this course and find work then get in contact with Tamsin by emailing tamsin@otesha.org.uk or calling 020 3609 6763.

Registration deadline March 18th 2013.

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Party

22nd November 2012 by

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Enterprise: a solution to our economic and environmental challenges?

31st October 2012 by

Otesha’s mission is to build a community of young people who see their lives as powerful tools for change. A part of that is to show people that they are citizens, not just consumers and that they aren’t defined by how they spend their money. But unless you’re emulating the Moneyless Man, then you’ll probably have to spend money on some things and we want to encourage you to think about how you can use that spending to support projects which have the best interests of people and planet in mind.

A social enterprise is a business which trades for a social and/or environmental purpose. These businesses operate with a ‘triple bottom line’ in which the economic, social and environmental performance is measured at the end of each year. Famous examples of companies which were set up explicitly to do good include Divine Chocolate (which as well as being Fairtrade is 45% owned by the farmers) and the Big Issue . Such companies produce a product and make a profit, whilst providing an opportunity for people facing barriers to improve their own skills and finances.

At Otesha we’ve been thinking about how we can use social enterprise at a more local level to tackle the huge environmental and economic problems facing the young people we work with. Along with our partners in the East London Green Jobs Alliance, we provide high quality environmental literacy and job readiness training to prepare young people for work. But with 1 million UK youth experiencing unemployment, what if there isn’t a green and decent job for them to go into? Increasingly, we’re saying ‘why not create your own?’

Setting up a social enterprise could provide meaningful work for young people in businesses which do a lot for our communities. A great example comes from our friends at the Golden Company, a social enterprise which works with young people in East London who want to become beekeepers. 15 people this year have learnt how to look after bees and then create, market and sell products made from their honey. At the other end of the scale Fair Finance, a social enterprise also based in East London, offers a range of financial services and support to people who are excluded, protecting them from loan sharks and predatory payday loan companies like Wonga.   They’re providing a service, creating jobs and improving the social benefits of community-level financial companies.

Otesha is currently producing a ‘how to guide’ for organisations and individuals looking to set up their own social enterprise. In the meantime, you can find out about funding opportunities and advice from our friends at UnLtd and the Young Foundation. If you have a social enterprise that you’d like us to share as a case study, get in touch with Claire at clairea@otesha.org.uk.

Laying down Roots of Success in East London

30th October 2012 by

99% of the UK is literate. Many of us are financially literate. But how many can claim to be environmentally literate?

Many of you reading this will be well aware of the far-reaching environmental impacts of our everyday actions, from what we choose to eat for breakfast, how we travel to work, how we conduct ourselves in the workspace to how we socialise.  We have become aware of the spaces we find ourselves in and the practices required to maintain or make them ‘green’.  But how many of us had these thoughts in our head when we were 16 or 17, deciding our ‘careers’?

Financial reward, professional development, qualifications needed… these were key factors to consider when ‘deciding our future’ as one career advisor put it.  I remember clearly taking a ‘career test’ when I was 15, a series of questions covering academic, personal and lifestyle preferences.   The result; I should look into becoming a telephone pylon erector; I didn’t mind heights, liked the outdoors and wanted variety in my job.   There was no mention of the environmental impact of this career choice- the resource intensive, carbon polluting energy sector I’d be working in, no mention of renewable energy, no mention of the vehicle I would inevitably be driving around in to erect these pylons.

11 years on, with the impacts of climate change being felt world-over, with resource wars a real or threatened phenomena on every continent- you’d expect environmental impact and sustainability to play a large part in career choice for today’s young people making the transition to work, right? Wrong.  A few months ago we were contacted by a careers advisor from a local connexions service in a bit of a panic- she’d had young people coming in asking about how to get a green job, some wanted to work in renewable energy.  They had no resources or knowledge to deal with it.  This is madness.

We know that to address the global challenges facing our economy and climate, we must transform society within a single generation.   The need to transition to a green economy is urgent if we are to meet the national target of 80% carbon emissions cuts by 2050.  And this transition requires green jobs. We know there are policy barriers to the creation of green jobs.  We also know that those making the transition to employment, both young and old, need to understand, want and demand green jobs.

That’s why, as part of our green jobs programme here at The Otesha Project UK, we’ve spent the last 10 months adapting the successful US environmental literacy and job readiness curriculum ‘Roots of Success’ for a UK audience.  It’s a 9-module curriculum, each one themed and aimed at raising awareness of local and global environmental issues whilst improving essential job market skills.  At the end of each module there are case studies on relevant green jobs, how to access them and career pathways.  It’s interactive and dynamic, using videos and discussion to engage and give participants a solid understanding of environmental literacy.

We’ve started piloting our UK version with groups here in east London.  We worked with a group of young people on the Princes-Trust Team Programme who took the introductory ‘Fundamentals’ module and the ‘Community Organising’ module which was used to help plan their community project.  We’ve also worked with trainee bike mechanics on Bikework’s ‘Cycle into Work’ scheme, running the fundamentals, transport and community organising modules.  We’ve had really positive feedback from participants, some learning “the importance of not wasting stuff”, another saying he would “Look into how [he] could incorporate eco friendly ideas in [his] business plan.”  The course aims to inspire and empower; one trainee left saying “I definitely want to have a green job!! I knew that already, but this class opened my eyes.”

And we’re planning more; we’ll soon be delivering the training with volunteers at Hackney City Farm, with trainee construction workers and homeless people at Crisis Skylight to help broker people facing barriers to employment into green and decent work;  helping to tackle massive youth unemployment and climate change.

 Tamsin Robertson, Otesha’s green jobs caseworker

Cuppa

8th October 2012 by

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Failing forward

13th July 2012 by

“I’ve missed more than 9000 shots in my career. I’ve lost almost 300 games. 26 times, I’ve been trusted to take the game winning shot and missed. I’ve failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed.” – Michael Jordan

Nobody likes to fail, do they? (…do they…? Answers on a postcard please). At least, I don’t like to fail. When a project hasn’t gone to plan, or ground to a halt, it is very tempting to go erase your mind somewhere in a tub of ice cream or TOWIE. Maybe that’s just me. Either way, sweeping failures under the carpet doesn’t do anyone any good. Because if we can’t share where we went wrong, or what barriers we found, how will others learn who are planning similar projects?

This is where the concept of ‘failshares’ comes in. Over the past few years, organisations such as Givewell have got brave and laid out their shortcomings. People across different sectors have got together and hosted ‘FailFaires’. Engineers Without Borders now release Failure Reports every year and have set up the site Admitting Failure to ensure that the international development community ‘fails forward.’ They define failing forward as:

  1. Operating in a safe environment for testing risky innovative ideas
  2. Recognizing failures early
  3. Admitting failures open and honestly
  4. Learning from these failures
  5. Adapting actions based on the learning in order to improve upon risky innovative ideas

So, in the spirit of failing forward, let me share the story of a project we have been trying to make happen over the past few months – the East London Greener Jobs Pipeline. We aimed for the Greener Jobs Pipeline project to work in partnership with employers, training providers and support agencies to create pathways into employment for approximately 15 young, unemployed people who wanted to work in the green trades. We planned to do this by taking participants through a training programme that encompassed pre-employment skills, vocational skills, financial literacy, wraparound support services, environmental literacy, and an apprenticeship or work placement in trades such as solar roofing, insulation, horticulture and recycling.

About 6 months ago, I wrote of some of the barriers that we were experiencing in trying to make this project happen. The main one was that we were eager to find an employer who could guarantee a work placement or apprenticeship before we recruited for the young people – we figured that there were enough training courses out there that led on to nothing. However, the truth was, we just couldn’t find an employer. We talked to dozens of businesses, but there were no jobs, especially after the FIT cuts. This delayed the project by months, but when we did eventually find an employer – a small, social enterprise that specialised in energy efficiency – we found yet more barriers to do with recruitment. We needed 10 young people to run the training, but when it came down to it, only 3 young people managed to make the registration day. This was despite having met with nearer 20 young people and their key workers who were keen to join the course and who planned to enroll.

So, what went wrong?

  • We were limited to a 16-18 age range because of government funding constraints. This was a really difficult age to outreach for because many at this age were already in education or training (which also made them ineligible for funding). Sadly, we had a lot of interest from 19 year olds that we had to turn away. If our age range had been broader, ‘we would have smashed it’, as one local youth worker from the Prince’s Trust said.
  • The time of year wasn’t that great – some young people who were interested in the course were about to sit their GCSEs, so our training started too early for them.
  • Working with ‘NEET’ young people can mean things don’t always go to plan - on the registration day, four confirmed attendees were absent due to: broken ribs, being arrested, housing problems and family problems.
  • The reliability of key workers – we often found that communicating directly with the young people was more efficient than trying to pin down their key workers – not the way round you want it to be. A couple of key workers were supposed to escort their young people to the registration day, but didn’t pick them up.
  • ‘Not another short course…’ - there is a real sense that young people can be jostled from one low-level course to another and not gain a meaningful qualification. Although the pipeline participants would have completed some pre-apprenticeship course content they were not gaining the full qualification, due to time constraints.
  • Unsure work placement offer- the above point was overcome with the provision of a guaranteed work placement. However, at the last minute our employer changed their offer of paid work from 3 weeks to 1-2 days – not enough to pull in young people when other courses with higher level qualifications being offered.

With lessons absorbed about partnerships, age of participants and timing, we hope that roll-out will now take place in autumn 2012. In the meantime we have been providing a training and employment signposting service to the young people who showed interest. We have helped, signposted and offered advice to 12 young people and 4 youth workers on other training and employment options. 4 of the young people have now applied for recommended courses and we remain in contact with the others and continue to send opportunities when they arise.

Although the project didn’t go ahead as planned, we have learnt important lessons which can be used when tried again later this year. The most important lesson is that there is a real need for this type of project. There are many young people who have slipped through the net, and even this project – which aims to engage with young people facing barriers to employment – has built in requirements that have been barriers to their participation.

Next time, we hope to use this learning so that we can:

  • Increase the age range
  • Start at a more appropriate time of year
  • Ensure that we only partner with an employer who can be truly involved in the design of the process, and that has capacity to provide paid work placements or apprenticeships
  • Ensure our training offer includes meaningful accreditation and qualifications

So, there you have it. Not everything works out. But we feel it’s important to share, as there are other people out there working towards the same goal of creating green jobs and skills for young people. It’s inevitable that approaches will be duplicated, but that’s only a good thing if we know that those approaches work!

Taking the time to examine the successes and failures of different aspects of our work also acknowledges the complexity of what we are trying to do. If it was so easy, the world would be saved by now, and we’d all have green and decent jobs. Amirite? Complex problems need complex solutions, and I feel like we’re on our way to figuring some of those solutions out.

 

ROAD TRIP!!!

1st June 2012 by

That’s right, I spent a substantial part of last month on the road with the One Million Climate Jobs Caravan, organised by the Campaign Against Climate Change Trade Union Group. There were two vans – one going round the North and one going round the South (and before you ask, they were the most fuel efficient vans possible) – and I hopped on for Birmingham, Southampton, Portsmouth, Brighton, and Manchester. Phew!

We would park up in the city centres during the day, telling people about the One Million Climate Jobs report that lays out a strategy for government investment that would create one million climate jobs, which would go a looong way towards addressing the double whammy we face at the moment, of climate change and economic recession. We had a petition for people to sign up to calling for the government to take on this strategy, and we had a lot of information on the tables from this campaign and others, like the UK Youth Climate Coalition’s Youth for Green Jobs campaign.

The consequence of having all this information, a sign-up sheet, and a massive van that said ONE MILLION CLIMATE JOBS on the side of it? People started queueing. For a job. We were approached, again and again, by people who were looking for a job and thought we were recruiting, and it was the same in all the towns the caravan visited apparently. We had to say, again and again, that we didn’t actually have jobs to offer, but we were campaigning for the government to create them! I met men on the dole who signed our petition, went to the job centre to sign on, and then came back to try and sign the petition again because they felt so strongly. I met a 17 year old girl who was 3 months pregnant and couldn’t find anyone to take her on. I met young people about to graduate from college or university, and were scared about the economic climate they were about to graduate into. And everyone I met, without exception, agreed that it made sense to create jobs in sectors that would also work to improve our environment and slow climate change.

The experience was heartbreaking, but also invigorating. It proved to me how dire the situation is for so many people across the country, that they think their best hope for a job might be a van parked up on the side of the road. But it also proved how essential it is that we are campaigning on this issue, and it showed how much support people have for the green jobs agenda. Because why wouldn’t they? IT MAKES SENSE.

In each town, there was a public meeting in the evening hosted by local organisers. People from the local councils, unions, and activist groups came together to see what they could do about creating climate / green jobs locally. I spoke to each of them about our experiences with the East London Green Jobs Alliance, sharing our learnings and the process by which we set it up and got it going. The meetings I went to were great, but to be honest, turn out was fairly low, with between 15 – 40 at each meeting (I think it was higher in the north). I don’t think it’s for lack of support for the agenda, as I really felt that out on the street. And those conversations I had on the street were educational, because unlike trade unionists or environmentalists, who have been banging on about this stuff for ages, I really felt that many people with no political agenda or affiliation were getting wise to the situation. And I felt that they were on the cusp of taking action. Maybe signing a petition was the first step.

It definitely won’t be their last. Because the economic situation isn’t going to get any better soon, nor is the environmental situation. There will come a moment, soon, when people who see a van on the side of the street won’t politely queue. They will scramble, and they will fight, and they will start to fill the halls at public meetings. And what will the government do then?


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